The United States Government, through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), is partnering with UNICEF and the Ministry of Education to provide $500,000 worth of school supplies to children in flood-affected communities.

This was revealed by the US Ambassador to Ghana, Virginia Evelyn Palmer at Battor in the North Tongu District of the Volta Region when she visited some of the impacted towns to gain first-hand knowledge of the situation.

The Ambassador interacted with flood survivors, including teachers, parents, students, the chiefs and queens of the areas, and was impressed by their deep bravery and resilience in the face of adversity.

She also met with government officials and the Member of Parliament (MP) of the area to discuss sustainable ways of supporting these communities and expressed solidarity with the affected people, and the country.

The Ambassador was accompanied by Fiachra McAsey, the UNICEF Deputy Country Representative, Barbara Clemens, the World Food Programme, Country Director, and other officials.

Madam Palmer stated that in the face of adversity, collective dedication would light the way to recovery.

“We must stand together, united in our resolve to support you to rebuild and recover,” she said, adding that the assistance would aid in the restoration of education and learning in the impacted towns.

The Ambassador disclosed that the US donated $100,000 in October 2023, to help save lives, lessen suffering and facilitate the recovery of flood victims.

She said USAID also worked with the World Food Programme and the National Disaster Management Organisation, to set up temporary shelters, water, sanitation and hygiene services for the victims and send one-time cash donations to 700 affected families.

“Today we are scaling up that support with $500,000 of additional support, with the focus specifically, to help schools return to normalcy and for students to continue to learn. This will help restore teaching and learning in communities affected by the floods,” she said.

The Ambassador said through the Akosombo Safe Activity, USAID and UNICEF were supplying temporary school tents and necessary supplies like recreational kits and “schools-in-a-box,” which included teaching and learning materials.

Madam Palmer said the US was Ghana’s biggest bilateral development partner and the decades of collaboration had saved thousands of lives and pledged its dedication to helping the people of Ghana, particularly in times of humanitarian need.

She used the visit to donate some educational materials to the affected communities.

Barbara Clemens, the World Food Programme Country Director praised the US and the Government of Ghana for the successful collaboration and support from others in handling the crisis.

Dr Yaw Osei Adutwum, the Minister for Education, said to prevent the truncation of children’s education in the affected areas, they redistributed some of them to other schools and provided them with guidance and counselling.

He said they had also carried out school health awareness campaigns aimed at ensuring that the children remained healthy to continue with their education and commended the children for their determination so far.

The Volta Regional Minister, Dr Archibald Yao Letsa, in an address delivered on his behalf by Mr Divine Osborn Fenu, the District Chief Executive for North Tongu, thanked the US Ambassador for the visit.

He expressed his gratitude for the ongoing support and collaboration between Ghana and the USA, saying the Ambassador’s visit highlighted the strong and enduring friendship between the two nations.

Mr Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwa, the MP of North Tongu, also commended the Ambassador for her visit and the US’s ongoing assistance to the flood-affected areas.